A poor imitation of a natural process: A call to reconsider the iPSC engineering technique

 Abstract

Reprogramming somatic cells into a pluripotent state is expected to initiate a new era in medicine. Because the precise underlying mechanism of reprogramming remains unclear, many efforts have been made to optimize induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) engineering. However, satisfactory results have not yet been attained. In this review, we focus on recent roadblocks in iPSC reprogramming engineering, such as the inefficiency of the process, tumorigenicity and heterogeneity of the generation. We conclude that cell reprogramming is a naturally occurring phenomenon rather than a biological technique. We will only be able to mimic the natural process of reprogramming when we fully understand its underlying mechanism. Finally, we highlight the alternative method of direct conversion, which avoids the use of iPSCs to generate cell materials for patient-specific cell therapy.

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Pages
4536 - 4544
doi
10.4161/cc.22575
Type
Review
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A poor imitation of a natural process: A call to reconsider the iPSC engineering technique